‘The Silkworm’ by Robert Galbraith

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‘When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, she just thinks he has gone off by himself for a few days- as he has done before- and she wants Strike to bring him home.
But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine’s disappearance than his wife realises. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel is published it will ruin lives- so there are a lot of people who might want to silence him.
And when Quine is found brutally murdered in bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before…’ 
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‘The Cuckoo’s Calling’ by Robert Galbraith

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‘When a troubled model falls to her death from a Mayfair balcony, it is assumed that she has committed suicide. However, her brother has his doubts and calls in private detective Cormoran Strike.
Strike is a war veteran- wounded both physically and psychologically- and his private life is in disarray. The case gives him a financial lifeline but it comes at a personal cost: the more he delves into the young model’s world, the darker things become and the closer he gets to terrible danger…’  Continue reading

‘Trials of Passion’ by Lisa Appignanesi

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‘When passion is in the picture, what is criminal, what is sane, what is mad or simply bad?
Brighton, 1870: A well-respected spinster infuses chocolate creams with strychnine in order to murder her ‘lover’s’ wife.
Paris, 1880: A popular performer stalks her betraying lover through the streets of the city for weeks and finally takes aim.
New York, 1906: A millionaire shoots dead a prominent architect in full view of a theatre audience.’  
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‘I, Claudius’ by Robert Graves

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‘Despised for his weakness and regarded by his family as little more than a stammering fool, the nobleman Claudius quietly survives the intrigues, bloody purges and mounting cruelty of the imperial Roman dynasties. In I, Claudius he watches from the sidelines to record the reigns of it’s emperor’s: from the wise Augustus and his villainous wife Livia to the sadistic Tiberius and the insane excesses of Caligula. Written in the form of Claudius’ autobiography, this is the first part of Robert Graves’s brilliant account of the madness and debauchery of ancient Rome, and stands as one of the most celebrated, gripping historical novels ever written.’ Continue reading

‘An Inspector Calls and Other Plays’ by J.B. Priestley

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“‘An Inspector Calls’, first produced in 1946 when society was undergoing sweeping transformations, has recently enjoyed an enormously successful revival. While holding its audience with the gripping tension of a detective thriller, it is also a philosophical play about social conscience and the crumbling of middle-class values. ‘Time and the Conways’ and ‘I Have Been Here Before’ belong to Priestley’s ‘time’ plays, in which he explores the idea of precognition and pits fate against free will. ‘The Linden Tree’ also challenges pre-conceived ideas of history when Professor Linden comes into conflict with his family about how life should be lived after the war.” Continue reading

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ by Margaret Atwood

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‘The Republic of Gilead offers Offred only one option: to breed. If she deviates, she will, like all dissenters, be hanged at the wall or sent out to die slowly of radiation sickness. But even a repressive state cannot obliterate desire- neither Offred’s nor that of the two men on which her future hangs.
Brilliantly conceived and executed,  this powerful evocation of twenty-first century America gives full rein to Margaret Atwood’s devastating irony, wit and astute perception.’
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‘The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger’ by Stephen King

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“Set in a world of extraordinary circumstances, filled with stunning visual imagery and unforgettable characters,  The Dark Tower series is Stephen King’s most visionary piece of storytelling that may well be his crowning achievement.
This newly revised and expanded edition of
 The Gunslinger, for which Stephen King has written a special introduction and forward, is the mesmerising first book in his spectacular, epic Dark Tower series.
In
 The Gunslinger, Stephen King introduces readers to one of his most enigmatic heroes, Roland of Gilead, the Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting figure, a loner, on a spellbinding journey into good and evil, in a desolate world which frighteningly echoes our own.
In his first step towards the powerful and mysterious Dark Tower, Roland encounters an alluring woman named Alice, begins a friendship with Jake, a kid from New York, and faces an agonising choice between damnation and salvation as he pursues the Man in Black.
Both grippingly realistic and eerily dreamlike,
 The Gunslinger leaves readers eagerly awaiting the next chapter.
AND THE TOWER IS CLOSER… 
  
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‘The Grapes of Wrath’ by John Steinbeck

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“‘I’ve done my damndest to rip a reader’s nerves to rag, I don’t want him satisfied.’ Shocking and controversial when it was first published in 1939, Steinbeck’s Pulitzer prize-winning epic, ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ remains his undisputed masterpiece. Set against the background of Dust Bowl Oklahoma and Californian migrant life, it tells of the Joad family, who, like thousands of others, are forced to travel west in search of the promised land. Their story is one of false hopes, thwarted desires and broken dreams, yet out of their suffering Steinbeck created a drama that is intensely human, yet majestic in its scale and moral vision; an eloquent tribute to the endurance and dignity of the human spirit.” Continue reading